Cognitive and neural contributions to understanding the conceptual system

Poldrack, R. A., Wagner, A. D. and Barsalou, L. W. (2008) Cognitive and neural contributions to understanding the conceptual system. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17(2), pp. 91-95. (doi:10.1111/j.1467-8721.2008.00555.x)

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Abstract

The conceptual system contains categorical knowledge about experience that supports the spectrum of cognitive processes. Cognitive science theories assume that categorical knowledge resides in a modular and amodal semantic memory, whereas neuroscience theories assume that categorical knowledge is grounded in the brain's modal systems for perception, action, and affect. Neuroscience has influenced theories of the conceptual system by stressing principles of neural processing in neural networks and by motivating grounded theories of cognition, which propose that simulations of experience represent knowledge. Cognitive science has influenced theories of the conceptual system by documenting conceptual phenomena and symbolic operations that must be grounded in the brain. Significant progress in understanding the conceptual system is most likely to occur if cognitive and neural approaches achieve successful integration.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Barsalou, Professor Lawrence
Authors: Poldrack, R. A., Wagner, A. D., and Barsalou, L. W.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Psychology
Journal Name:Current Directions in Psychological Science
Publisher:SAGE Publications
ISSN:0963-7214
ISSN (Online):1467-8721

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