A pilot study to determine if using a lightweight, wearable micro-camera improves dietary assessment accuracy and offers other valuable data

Pettitt, C., Liu, J., Kwasnicki, R. M., Yang, G.-Z., Preston, T. and Frost, G. (2016) A pilot study to determine if using a lightweight, wearable micro-camera improves dietary assessment accuracy and offers other valuable data. British Journal of Nutrition, 115(1), pp. 160-167. (doi:10.1017/S0007114515004262) (PMID:26537614)

Pettitt, C., Liu, J., Kwasnicki, R. M., Yang, G.-Z., Preston, T. and Frost, G. (2016) A pilot study to determine if using a lightweight, wearable micro-camera improves dietary assessment accuracy and offers other valuable data. British Journal of Nutrition, 115(1), pp. 160-167. (doi:10.1017/S0007114515004262) (PMID:26537614)

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Abstract

A major limitation in nutritional science is the lack of understanding of the nutritional intake of free-living people. There is an inverse relationship between accuracy of reporting of energy intake by all current nutritional methodologies and body weight. In this pilot study we aim to explore whether using a novel lightweight, wearable micro-camera improves the accuracy of dietary intake assessment. Doubly labelled water (DLW) was used to estimate energy expenditure and intake over a 14-d period, over which time participants (n 6) completed a food diary and wore a micro-camera on 2 of the days. Comparisons were made between the estimated energy intake from the reported food diary alone and together with the images from the micro-camera recordings. There was an average daily deficit of 3912 kJ using food diaries to estimate energy intake compared with estimated energy expenditure from DLW (P=0·0118), representing an under-reporting rate of 34 %. Analysis of food diaries alone showed a significant deficit in estimated daily energy intake compared with estimated intake from food diary analysis with images from the micro-camera recordings (405 kJ). Use of the micro-camera images in conjunction with food diaries improves the accuracy of dietary assessment and provides valuable information on macronutrient intake and eating rate. There is a need to develop this recording technique to remove user and assessor bias.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Preston, Professor Thomas
Authors: Pettitt, C., Liu, J., Kwasnicki, R. M., Yang, G.-Z., Preston, T., and Frost, G.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre
Journal Name:British Journal of Nutrition
Journal Abbr.:Brit. J. Nutr.
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0007-1145
ISSN (Online):1475-2662
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 The Authors
First Published:First published in British Journal of Nutrition 115(1):160-167
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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