From homeostatic to hedonic theories of eating: self-regulatory failure in food-rich rnvironments

Stroebe, W., Papies, E. K. and Aarts, H. (2008) From homeostatic to hedonic theories of eating: self-regulatory failure in food-rich rnvironments. Applied Psychology, 57(s1), pp. 172-193. (doi:10.1111/j.1464-0597.2008.00360.x)

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Abstract

Psychological theories of weight regulation are based on homeostatic feedback assumptions. They mostly attribute the cause of overweight and obesity to lowered sensitivity to internal hunger and satiety cues. Based on the assumption that human food consumption in food-rich environments is increasingly driven by pleasure rather than need for calories, a goal conflict theory of hedonic eating is presented. This theory is not only supported by the outcome of our own research programme but can also account for findings of the research conducted in the context of other psychological theories. Some implications for weight loss strategies are discussed.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Papies, Dr Esther
Authors: Stroebe, W., Papies, E. K., and Aarts, H.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Applied Psychology
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
ISSN:0269-994X
ISSN (Online):1464-0597

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