Pharmacological inhibition of 3 integrin reduces the inflammatory toxicities caused by oncolytic adenovirus without compromising anticancer activity

Browne, A., Tookman, L.A., Ingemarsdotter, C.K., Bouwman, R.D., Pirlo, K., Wang, Y., Mcneish, I.A. and Lockley, M. (2015) Pharmacological inhibition of 3 integrin reduces the inflammatory toxicities caused by oncolytic adenovirus without compromising anticancer activity. Cancer Research, 75(14), pp. 2811-2821. (doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.can-14-3761) (PMID:25977332)

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Abstract

Adenoviruses have been clinically tested as anticancer therapies but their utility has been severely limited by rapid, systemic cytokine release and consequent inflammatory toxicity. Here, we describe a new approach to tackling these dangerous side effects. Using human ovarian cancer cell lines as well as malignant epithelial cells harvested from the ascites of women with ovarian cancer, we show that tumor cells do not produce cytokines in the first 24 hours following in vitro infection with the oncolytic adenovirus dl922-947. In contrast, dl922-947 does induce inflammatory cytokines at early time points following intraperitoneal delivery in mice with human ovarian cancer intraperitoneal xenografts. In these animals, cytokines originate predominantly in murine tissues, especially in macrophage-rich organs such as the spleen. We use a nonreplicating adenovirus to confirm that early cytokine production is independent of adenoviral replication. Using β3 integrin knockout mice injected intraperitoneally with dl922-947 and β3 null murine peritoneal macrophages, we confirm a role for macrophage cell surface β3 integrin in this dl922-947–induced inflammation. We present new evidence that co-administration of a cyclic RGD-mimetic–specific inhibitor of β3 integrin significantly attenuates the cytokine release and inflammatory hepatic toxicity induced by dl922-947 in an intraperitoneal murine model of ovarian cancer. Importantly, we find no evidence that β3 inhibition compromises viral infectivity and oncolysis in vitro or anticancer efficacy in vivo. By enabling safe, systemic delivery of replicating adenoviruses, this novel approach could have a major impact on the future development of these effective anticancer agents.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mcneish, Professor Iain
Authors: Browne, A., Tookman, L.A., Ingemarsdotter, C.K., Bouwman, R.D., Pirlo, K., Wang, Y., Mcneish, I.A., and Lockley, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cancer Sciences
Journal Name:Cancer Research
Publisher:American Association for Cancer Research
ISSN:0008-5472
ISSN (Online):1538-7445

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