Ability of plant callus cultures to synthesize and accumulate lower terpenoids

Banthorpe, D. V., Branch, S. A., Njar, V. C.O., Osborne, M. G. and Watson, D. G. (1986) Ability of plant callus cultures to synthesize and accumulate lower terpenoids. Phytochemistry, 25(3), pp. 629-636. (doi:10.1016/0031-9422(86)88013-x)

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Abstract

Callus cultures derived from seven oil-producing plants have been maintained under different regimes of media, temperature and illumination, and have been assayed for ability both to synthesize and to accumulate mono- and sesqui-terpenes. Callus of Pinus radiata (the sole gymnosperm) accumulated (α- and β-pinenes at levels comparable with those in the parent stem and needles; and that of Jasminum officinale accumulated traces of several monoterpenes (< 0.1 % the amount in petals) but cultures of Rosmarinus officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Anethum graveolens, Ocimum basilicum and Tanacetum vulgare did not detectably accumulate the lower terpenoids or secrete them into the medium. However, all seven culture lines yielded cell-free extracts containing prenyltransferase and an isomerizing system (as assayed by conversion of IPP into GPP, NPP and FPP) with activities some fold greater than those extracted from the parent mature plants, or up to 90-fold the levels extractable from young seedlings of the various species. Callus of five of the species (A. graveolens and O. basilicum were not assayed) also contained MVA-kinase, MVAP-kinase, MVAPP-decarboxylase and IPP-DMAPP isomerase at levels comparable with those in the parent tissue. Hence the angiosperms yielded cultures that presumably contained the crucial enzyniic machinery necessary for the synthesis of the lower terpenoids, although accumulation of those compounds did not occur. Reasons for this unexpected situation are discussed. These results imply that callus cultures may be a convenient source of biomass for studies on the enzymes of terpenoid biosynthesis.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Osborne, Professor Michael
Authors: Banthorpe, D. V., Branch, S. A., Njar, V. C.O., Osborne, M. G., and Watson, D. G.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Education > Social Justice Place and Lifelong Education
Journal Name:Phytochemistry
Publisher:Pergamon Press Ltd.
ISSN:0031-9422
ISSN (Online):1873-3700

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