A cross-cultural comparison of college students' learning strategies for academic achievement between South Korea and the USA

Lee, H.-J., Lee, J., Makara Fuller, K. A. , Fishman, B. J. and Teasley, S. D. (2017) A cross-cultural comparison of college students' learning strategies for academic achievement between South Korea and the USA. Studies in Higher Education, 42(1), pp. 169-183. (doi:10.1080/03075079.2015.1045473)

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Abstract

This study explores how the relationship between college students' learning strategies and their grade point average (GPA) differs across two culturally different institutions. Surveys of 621 students at a South Korean university and 824 students at a university in the USA were used to assess four types of learning strategies: motivation-related, assignment/task-related, planning/time-related, and cognition-related strategies. The results show that all four types of learning strategies significantly predict students' GPA at the Korean university, whereas only motivation-related and assignment/task-related strategies predict students' GPA at the US university. The cognition-related learning strategy factor is the strongest predictor of GPA for Korean students, but it is unrelated to US students' GPA. The resulting differences in the learning strategies used to obtain high achievement are interpreted through the lens of cultural influence and institutional accountability with respect to the missions of higher education institutions.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Makara Fuller, Dr Kara
Authors: Lee, H.-J., Lee, J., Makara Fuller, K. A., Fishman, B. J., and Teasley, S. D.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Education > Pedagogy Policy and Practice
Journal Name:Studies in Higher Education
Journal Abbr.:Stud. high. educ.
Publisher:Routledge
ISSN:0307-5079
ISSN (Online):1470-174X
Published Online:30 June 2015
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 Society for Research into Higher Education
First Published:First published in Studies in Higher Education 42(1): 169-183

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