Neurovasculature of Temporalis for Orbital Reanimation

Lightfoot, R. and Rea, P. (2015) Neurovasculature of Temporalis for Orbital Reanimation. International Congress of Clinical Anatomy, University of Rouen, France, 24-27 Jun 2015.

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Lagophthalmos is a major problem associated with facial nerve palsy and can lead to blindness. Facial reanimation procedures for the orbit are limited; the regional transfer of the temporalis muscle is a dynamic surgical technique used to correct lagophthalmos and restore orbital animation. In order to ensure a successful muscle transposition, a detailed knowledge of the intramuscular neurovasculature of the temporalis is essential, however, limited literature exists in this field. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the neurovasculature of the temporalis for transposition to the outer canthus in eyelid reanimation. Cadaveric dissection of a single male cadaver was carried out, from which 2 temporalis muscles and 1 deep temporal fascia were obtained and divided into 28 segments in total. 10 sections from each temporalis and fascia segment were stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin to identify the neurovascular pattern of the temporalis. A pattern of neurovasculature was identified; there was an abundance of arteries, veins and nerves observed in the temporalis muscles and fascia, especially in the segments of the inferior regions of the muscle tendon. It can be concluded that the temporalis is an ideal candidate for orbital reanimation due to its densely populated nature and proximity to the surgical field. An enhanced understanding of the intramuscular neurovasculature is essential for selection of the optimum window of temporalis for transposition to the outer canthus. Increased knowledge of the temporalis anatomy would greatly aid the facial surgeon to ensure the success of this procedure.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Rea, Dr Paul
Authors: Lightfoot, R., and Rea, P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record