The impact of within-herd genetic variation upon inferred transmission trees for foot-and-mouth disease virus

Valdazo-González, B., Kim, J. T., Soubeyrand, S., Wadsworth, J., Knowles, N. J., Haydon, D. and King, D. P. (2015) The impact of within-herd genetic variation upon inferred transmission trees for foot-and-mouth disease virus. Infection, Genetics and Evolution, 32, pp. 440-448. (doi: 10.1016/j.meegid.2015.03.032) (PMID:25861750)

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Abstract

Full-genome sequences have been used to monitor the fine-scale dynamics of epidemics caused by RNA viruses. However, the ability of this approach to confidently reconstruct transmission trees is limited by the knowledge of the genetic diversity of viruses that exist within different epidemiological units. In order to address this question, this study investigated the variability of 45 foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome sequences (from 33 animals) that were collected during 2007 from eight premises (10 different herds) in the United Kingdom. Bayesian and statistical parsimony analysis demonstrated that these sequences exhibited clustering which was consistent with a transmission scenario describing herd-to-herd spread of the virus. As an alternative to analysing all of the available samples in future epidemics, the impact of randomly selecting one sequence from each of these herds was used to assess cost-effective methods that might be used to infer transmission trees during FMD outbreaks. Using these approaches, 85% and 91% of the resulting topologies were either identical or differed by only one edge from a reference tree comprising all of the sequences generated within the outbreak. The sequence distances that accrued during sequential transmission events between epidemiological units was estimated to be 4.6 nucleotides, although the genetic variability between viruses recovered from chronic carrier animals was higher than between viruses from animals with acute-stage infection: an observation which poses challenges for the use of simple approaches to infer transmission trees. This study helps to develop strategies for sampling during FMD outbreaks, and provides data that will guide the development of further models to support control policies in the event of virus incursions into FMD free countries.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Haydon, Professor Daniel
Authors: Valdazo-González, B., Kim, J. T., Soubeyrand, S., Wadsworth, J., Knowles, N. J., Haydon, D., and King, D. P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Infection, Genetics and Evolution
Publisher:Elsevier B.V.
ISSN:1567-1348
ISSN (Online):1567-7257
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 The Authors
First Published:First published in Infection, Genetics and Evolution 32:440-448
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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