A cross-cultural study of possible iatrogenic effects of gifted education programs: tenth grader’s perceptions of academically high-performing classmates

Oh, H., Sutherland, M. , Stack, N., Badia, M., Blumen, S., Nguyen Quoc, A.-T., Wormald, C., Maakrun, J. and Ziegler, A. (2015) A cross-cultural study of possible iatrogenic effects of gifted education programs: tenth grader’s perceptions of academically high-performing classmates. High Ability Studies, 26(1), pp. 152-166. (doi:10.1080/13598139.2015.1044080)

[img]
Preview
Text
106347.pdf - Accepted Version

675kB

Abstract

Previous empirical studies have yielded inconclusive results about peer perceptions of academically high performing students. The purpose of this study was to investigate students’ perceptions of the intellectual ability, positive social qualities, and popularity of a hypothetical new high performing classmate. Participants were 1060 Vietnamese, South Korean, British, Australian, Peruvian, and Spanish boys and girls in 10th grade. The results revealed that the perceptions of academically high performing classmates differed by country group. Positive perceptions of intellectual ability and social qualities were commonly found in all countries except the two Asian countries (Vietnam and South Korea), where the students reported more neutral views of high performers. In conclusion, it is argued that there is no evidence for possible iatrogenic effects of gifted education programs aiming at high achievements.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sutherland, Dr Margaret and Stack, Professor Niamh
Authors: Oh, H., Sutherland, M., Stack, N., Badia, M., Blumen, S., Nguyen Quoc, A.-T., Wormald, C., Maakrun, J., and Ziegler, A.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Psychology
College of Social Sciences > School of Education > Social Justice Place and Lifelong Education
Journal Name:High Ability Studies
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1359-8139
ISSN (Online):1469-834X
Published Online:04 June 2015
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 Taylor and Francis
First Published:First published in High Ability Studies 26(1):152-166
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record