Novel technique for thermal lens measurement in commonly used optical components

Bogan, C., Kwee, P., Hild, S. , Huttner, S. H. and Willke, B. (2015) Novel technique for thermal lens measurement in commonly used optical components. Optics Express, 23(12), pp. 15380-15389. (doi:10.1364/OE.23.015380)

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Abstract

The absorption of light in transmissive optics cause a thermally induced effect known as thermal lensing. This effect provokes an often undesired change of a laser beam transmitted by the optic. In this paper we present a measurement method that allows us to determine thermal lensing in commonly used optical components. The beam influenced by the thermal lens is expanded into the eigenmodes of an optical cavity, and its modal content is analyzed in the eigenbasis of the cavity. The measured quantity depends neither on beam parameters nor on the position of the optical component under investigation. This method allows, to our knowledge, for the first time the direct measurement of the mode conversion coefficient je2j of the thermal lens.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hild, Professor Stefan and Huttner, Dr Sabina
Authors: Bogan, C., Kwee, P., Hild, S., Huttner, S. H., and Willke, B.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Physics and Astronomy
Journal Name:Optics Express
Publisher:Optical Society of America
ISSN:1094-4087
ISSN (Online):1094-4087
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 Optical Society of America
First Published:First published in Optics Express 23(12):15380-15389
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
624341Investigations in Gravitational Radiation / Particle Astrophysics Capital equipmentSheila RowanScience & Technologies Facilities Council (STFC)ST/L000946/1S&E P&A - PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY