A "Diabetes Acute Care Day" for medical students increases their knowledge and confidence of diabetes care: a pilot study

MacEwen, A.W., Carty, D.M., McConnachie, A. , McKay, G.A. and Boyle, J.G. (2016) A "Diabetes Acute Care Day" for medical students increases their knowledge and confidence of diabetes care: a pilot study. BMC Medical Education, 16, p. 88. (doi: 10.1186/s12909-016-0600-x) (PMID:26956764) (PMCID:PMC4784451)

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Abstract

Background: Evidence suggests that junior doctors lack the confidence and skills to manage acute/inpatient diabetes. We investigated the impact of the introduction of a “Diabetes Acute Care Day” on undergraduate medical students’ knowledge and confidence in acute/inpatient diabetes. Methods: Participants attended four short lectures on the basics of diabetes, diabetic emergencies, inpatient diabetes management and peri-operative/procedure care followed by case-based learning tutorials on diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS) and hypoglycaemia using capillary blood glucose charts to interpret and practice subsequent insulin prescription and adjustment. Participants were asked to complete multiple-choice questions and confidence questionnaires using a visual analogue score pre and post participation. Results: One hundred forty-four students completed the pre-course survey and 196 completed the post-course survey. Mean confidence using a visual analogue score increased in all areas with a mean at baseline of 46.9 mm rising to 71.2 mm post-participation (p < 0.001). The largest increases were in the management of HHS, patients on subcutaneous and intravenous insulin and perioperative/procedure care. The mean mark obtained in the pre-test multiple choice questions (MCQs) was 2.72 (27.2 %) and increased to 4.74 (47.4 %) on the post-score MCQs (p < 0.001). 56.9 % of participants answered all 10 pre-test MCQs with the mean number of questions answered = 4.71 rising to 82.0 % of students answered all ten questions and the mean number of questions answered = 9.56 in the post-test MCQs. Conclusions: An intensive “Diabetes Acute Care Day” consisting of themed live lectures and case-based learning tutorials is an effective way to increase medical students’ knowledge and confidence in acute/inpatient diabetes. Further development and evaluation of this educational intervention is required to assess the impact of on patient care in the clinical setting post graduation.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Boyle, Dr James and McConnachie, Professor Alex and Macewen, Dr Alison and McKay, Dr Gerard and Carty, Dr David
Authors: MacEwen, A.W., Carty, D.M., McConnachie, A., McKay, G.A., and Boyle, J.G.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:BMC Medical Education
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1472-6920
ISSN (Online):1472-6920
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 MacEwen et al.
First Published:First published in BMC Medical Education
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons licence

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