The effectiveness of self-management support interventions for men with long-term conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Galdas, P., Fell, J., Bower, P., Kidd, L. , Blickem, C., McPherson, K., Hunt, K. , Gilbody, S. and Richardson, G. (2015) The effectiveness of self-management support interventions for men with long-term conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Open, 5(3), e006620. (doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-006620) (PMID:25795688) (PMCID:PMC4368927)

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Abstract

Objectives To assess the effectiveness of self-management support interventions in men with long-term conditions. Methods: A quantitative systematic review with meta-analysis. Data sources: The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched to identify published reviews of self-management support interventions. Relevant reviews were screened to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of self-management support interventions conducted in men alone, or which analysed the effects of interventions by sex. Review methods: Data on relevant outcomes, patient populations, intervention type and study quality were extracted. Quality appraisal was conducted using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Meta-analysis was conducted to compare the effects of interventions in men, women, and mixed-sex sub-groups. Results: 40 RCTs of self-management support interventions in men, and 20 eligible RCTs where an analysis by sex was reported, were included in the review. Meta-analysis suggested that physical activity, education, and peer support-based interventions have a positive impact on quality of life in men. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to make strong statements about whether self-management support interventions show larger, similar or smaller effects in men compared with women and mixed-sex groups. Conclusions: Clinicians may wish to consider whether certain types of self-management support (eg, physical activity, education, peer support) are particularly effective in men, although more research is needed to fully determine and explore this.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hunt, Professor Kathryn and Kidd, Dr Lisa
Authors: Galdas, P., Fell, J., Bower, P., Kidd, L., Blickem, C., McPherson, K., Hunt, K., Gilbody, S., and Richardson, G.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:BMJ Open
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2044-6055
ISSN (Online):2044-6055
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMJ Open 5(3):e006620
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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