Do people make different risk-based decisions for their children than for themselves?

Tang, M. Y., Shahab, L., Robb, K. and Gardner, B. (2013) Do people make different risk-based decisions for their children than for themselves? Psychology and Health, 28(S1), p. 156.

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Abstract

People tend to be unrealistically optimistic about personal health risks, yet parents are often highly sensitive to risks when making health-related decisions for their children. This study explored whether parents are more likely to vaccinate their children than themselves in hypothetical risk scenarios. Methods. A within-subjects online survey design was used. 245 parents chose whether to vaccinate in nine fictional influenza scenarios, which varied by risk level associated with non-vaccination (low, medium, high), and risk target (self, child, own parent [control]). Scenarios were presented in one of three set sequences. Findings. Controlling for risk level, participants were more likely to vaccinate their child than themselves, but only where the task sequence began with a scenario relating to themselves or their parent (F[4,14] = 4.49, p<.001). Discussion. People may be more risk-averse in decisions for their children than for themselves. This warrants further investigation in more methodologically robust studies.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:European Health Psychology Society Conference 2013, Bordeaux, France; July 2013. Abstract.
Status:Published
Refereed:No
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Robb, Dr Kathryn
Authors: Tang, M. Y., Shahab, L., Robb, K., and Gardner, B.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
Journal Name:Psychology and Health
Publisher:Routledge (Taylor and Francis)
ISSN:0887-0446
ISSN (Online):1476-8321

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