Psychiatric penguins: writing on psychiatry for Penguin Books Ltd, c.1950-c.1980

Miller, G. (2015) Psychiatric penguins: writing on psychiatry for Penguin Books Ltd, c.1950-c.1980. History of the Human Sciences, 28(4), pp. 76-101. (doi:10.1177/0952695115586121)

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Abstract

The British mass-market publisher Penguin produced a number of texts on psychiatric topics in the period c.1950–c.1980. Investigation of editorial files relating to a sample of these volumes reveals that they were shaped as much by the commercial imperatives and changing aspirations of the publisher as by developments and debates in psychiatry itself. A number of economic imperatives influenced the publishing process, including the perennial difficulty in finding psychiatrists willing and able to enter the popular book market; the economic pressures exerted on peer-review protocols; and the identification of a niche market in popular psychiatry, latterly of a politically radical flavour. As well as offering a materialist standpoint for the study of popular psychiatric texts, this investigation allows an opportunity to adapt, apply and assess theoretical approaches to mass-market publishing by psychiatrists.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Miller, Dr Gavin
Authors: Miller, G.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Critical Studies > English Literature
Journal Name:History of the Human Sciences
Publisher:SAGE Publications
ISSN:0952-6951
ISSN (Online):1461-720X
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 The Author
First Published:First published in History of the Human Sciences 28(4):76-101
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
625221Psychiatry in the book market: writing on psychiatry and mental health for Penguin (1945-1990)Gavin MillerThe Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland (CARNEGIE)Prof A Miller 2CRIT - ENGLISH LITERATURE