The insect capa neuropeptides impact desiccation and cold tolerance

Terhzaz, S. , Teets, N., Cabrero, P. , Henderson, L., Richie, M. G., Nachman, R. J., Dow, J. A. T. , Denlinger, D. L. and Davies, S.-A. (2015) The insect capa neuropeptides impact desiccation and cold tolerance. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(9), pp. 2882-2887. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1501518112) (PMID:25730885) (PMCID:PMC4352776)

Terhzaz, S. , Teets, N., Cabrero, P. , Henderson, L., Richie, M. G., Nachman, R. J., Dow, J. A. T. , Denlinger, D. L. and Davies, S.-A. (2015) The insect capa neuropeptides impact desiccation and cold tolerance. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 112(9), pp. 2882-2887. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1501518112) (PMID:25730885) (PMCID:PMC4352776)

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Abstract

The success of insects is linked to their impressive tolerance to environmental stress, but little is known about how such responses are mediated by the neuroendocrine system. Here we show that the capability (capa) neuropeptide gene is a desiccation- and cold stress-responsive gene in diverse dipteran species. Using targeted in vivo gene silencing, physiological manipulations, stress-tolerance assays, and rationally designed neuropeptide analogs, we demonstrate that the Drosophila melanogaster capa neuropeptide gene and its encoded peptides alter desiccation and cold tolerance. Knockdown of the capa gene increases desiccation tolerance but lengthens chill coma recovery time, and injection of capa peptide analogs can reverse both phenotypes. Immunohistochemical staining suggests that capa accumulates in the capa-expressing Va neurons during desiccation and nonlethal cold stress but is not released until recovery from each stress. Our results also suggest that regulation of cellular ion and water homeostasis mediated by capa peptide signaling in the insect Malpighian (renal) tubules is a key physiological mechanism during recovery from desiccation and cold stress. This work augments our understanding of how stress tolerance is mediated by neuroendocrine signaling and illustrates the use of rationally designed peptide analogs as agents for disrupting protective stress tolerance.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Henderson, Ms Louise and Cabrero, Mr Pablo and Dow, Professor Julian and Terhzaz, Dr Selim and Davies, Professor Shireen
Authors: Terhzaz, S., Teets, N., Cabrero, P., Henderson, L., Richie, M. G., Nachman, R. J., Dow, J. A. T., Denlinger, D. L., and Davies, S.-A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
ISSN (Online):1091-6490
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 The Authors
First Published:First published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112(9):2882-2887
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
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