Barriers To Ethical Behaviour and Stability: Stereotyping and Scapegoating as Pretexts for Avoiding Responsibility

Hersh, M.A. (2011) Barriers To Ethical Behaviour and Stability: Stereotyping and Scapegoating as Pretexts for Avoiding Responsibility. In: 18th World Congress of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC), Milan, Italy, 28th Aug - 2 Sep 2011, pp. 3998-4009. (doi:10.3182/20110828-6-IT-1002.02475)

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Abstract

The paper considers the relationship between stereotyping, scapegoating, unethical behaviour and instability and shows how stereotyping and scapegoating can contribute to national and international instability. It presents a revised version of a three-part model of conflict previously developed by the author, with the components of an issue of dispute, a context which favours violence over peaceful resolution, and a trigger event, and shows how some of the theories of scapegoating and the resulting violence fit into this model. The paper also discusses potential solutions to current vicious cycles in which unethical behaviour, stereotyping and scapegoating promote or lead to instability. The role of multi-loop action learning and organizations such as SWIIS are highlighted in providing support for whistleblowing, responsibility and accountability at both the collective and individual levels, a strengthening of both individual and group identities and increasing respect for currently stereotyped and discriminated against outgroups, which will reduce their vulnerability to scapegoating. The role of systems approaches to the study of conflict situations is also briefly discussed.

Item Type:Conference Proceedings
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hersh, Dr Marion
Authors: Hersh, M.A.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Biomedical Engineering
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