The effect of using an interactive booklet on childhood respiratory tract infections in consultations: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care

Francis, N. A., Hood, K., Simpson, S. , Wood, F., Nuttall, J. and Butler, C. C. (2008) The effect of using an interactive booklet on childhood respiratory tract infections in consultations: study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care. BMC Family Practice, 9(1), p. 23. (doi: 10.1186/1471-2296-9-23)

[img] Text
101891.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

344kB

Publisher's URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-9-23

Abstract

<b>Background</b> Respiratory tract infections in children result in more primary care consultations than any other acute condition, and are the most common reason for prescribing antibiotics (which are largely unnecessary). About a fifth of children consult again for the same illness episode. Providing parents with written information on respiratory tract infections may result in a reduction in re-consultation rates and antibiotic prescribing for these illnesses. Asking clinicians to provide and discuss the information during the consultation may enhance effectiveness. This paper outlines the protocol for a study designed to evaluate the use of a booklet on respiratory tract infections in children within primary care consultations.<p></p> <b>Methods/Design</b> This will be a cluster randomised controlled trial. General practices will be randomised to provide parents consulting because their child has an acute respiratory tract infection with either an interactive booklet, or usual care. The booklet provides information on the expected duration of their child's illness, the likely benefits of various treatment options, signs and symptoms that should prompt re-consultation, and symptomatic treatment advice. It has been designed for use within the consultation and aims to enhance communication through the use of specific prompts. Clinicians randomised to using the interactive booklet will receive online training in its use. Outcomes will be assessed via a telephone interview with the parent two weeks after first consulting. The primary outcome will be the proportion of children who re-consult for the same illness episode. Secondary outcomes include: antibiotic use, parental satisfaction and enablement, and illness costs. Consultation rates for respiratory tract infections for the subsequent year will be assessed by a review of practice notes.<p></p> <b>Discussion</b> Previous studies in adults and children have shown that educational interventions can result in reductions in re-consultation rates and use of antibiotics for respiratory tract infections. This will be the first study to determine whether providing parents with a booklet on respiratory tract infections in children, and discussing it with them during the consultation, reduces re-consultations and antibiotic use for the same illness without reducing satisfaction with care.<p></p> <b>Trial registration</b> Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN46104365<p></p>

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Simpson, Professor Sharon
Authors: Francis, N. A., Hood, K., Simpson, S., Wood, F., Nuttall, J., and Butler, C. C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:BMC Family Practice
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1471-2296
ISSN (Online):1471-2296
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2008 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMC Family Practice 9(1):23
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
Related URLs:

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record