Higher effort-reward imbalance and lower job control predict exit from the labour market at the age of 61 years or younger: evidence from the English longitudinal study of ageing

Hintsa, T., Kouvonen, A., McCann, M. , Jokela, M., Elovainio, M. and Demakakos, P. (2015) Higher effort-reward imbalance and lower job control predict exit from the labour market at the age of 61 years or younger: evidence from the English longitudinal study of ageing. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 69(6), pp. 543-549. (doi:10.1136/jech-2014-205148) (PMID:25631860) (PMCID:PMC4453492)

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Abstract

Background We examined whether higher effort–reward imbalance (ERI) and lower job control are associated with exit from the labour market. Methods There were 1263 participants aged 50–74 years from the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing with data on working status and work-related psychosocial factors at baseline (wave 2; 2004–2005), and working status at follow-up (wave 5; 2010–2011). Psychosocial factors at work were assessed using a short validated version of ERI and job control. An allostatic load index was formed using 13 biological parameters. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Exit from the labour market was defined as not working in the labour market when 61 years old or younger in 2010–2011. Results Higher ERI OR=1.62 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.61, p=0.048) predicted exit from the labour market independent of age, sex, education, occupational class, allostatic load and depression. Job control OR=0.60 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.85, p=0.004) was associated with exit from the labour market independent of age, sex, education, occupation and depression. The association of higher effort OR=1.32 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.73, p=0.045) with exit from the labour market was independent of age, sex and depression but attenuated to non-significance when additionally controlling for socioeconomic measures. Reward was not related to exit from the labour market. Conclusions Stressful work conditions can be a risk for exiting the labour market before the age of 61 years. Neither socioeconomic position nor allostatic load and depressive symptoms seem to explain this association.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Mccann, Dr Mark
Authors: Hintsa, T., Kouvonen, A., McCann, M., Jokela, M., Elovainio, M., and Demakakos, P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
Journal Name:Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0143-005X
ISSN (Online):1470-2738
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2015 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 69(6):543-549
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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