Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) about rabies prevention and control: a community survey in Tanzania

Sambo, M., Lembo, T. , Cleaveland, S. , Ferguson, H. , Sikana, L., Simon, C., Urassa, H. and Hampson, K. (2014) Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) about rabies prevention and control: a community survey in Tanzania. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 8(12), e3310. (doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003310) (PMID:25473834) (PMCID:PMC4256472)

[img]
Preview
Text
101193.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

517kB

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite being entirely preventable,canine rabies still kills 55,000 people/year in developing countries. Information about local beliefs and practices can identify knowledge gaps that may affect prevention practices and lead to unnecessary deaths. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated knowledge, attitudes and practices related to rabies and its prevention and control amongst a cross-section of households (n = 5,141)in urban and rural areas of central, southern and northern Tanzania. Over 17% of respondents owned domestic dogs (average of 2.3 dogs/household), >95% had heard about rabies, and >80% knew that rabies is transmitted through dog bites. People who (1)had greater education,(2)originated from areas with a history of rabies interventions,(3)had experienced exposure by a suspect rabid animal,(4)were male and(5)owned dogs were more likely to have greater knowledge about the disease. Around 80% of respondents would seek hospital treatment after a suspect bite, but only 5% were aware of the need for prompt wound cleansing after a bite. Although >65% of respondents knew of dog vaccination as a means to control rabies, only 51% vaccinated their dogs. Determinants of dog vaccination included(1)being a male-headed household,(2)presence of children,(3)low economic status,(4)residing in urban areas,(5)owning livestock,(6)originating from areas with rabies interventions and(7)having purchased a dog. The majority of dog-owning respondents were willing to contribute no more than US$0.31 towards veterinary services. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified important knowledge gaps related to, and factors influencing the prevention and control of rabies in Tanzania. Increasing knowledge regarding wound washing, seeking post-exposure prophylaxis and the need to vaccinate dogs are likely to result in more effective prevention of rabies; however, greater engagement of the veterinary and medical sectors is also needed to ensure the availability of preventative services.

Item Type:Articles (Other)
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Lembo, Dr Tiziana and Cleaveland, Professor Sarah and Hampson, Dr Katie and Ferguson, Professor Heather
Authors: Sambo, M., Lembo, T., Cleaveland, S., Ferguson, H., Sikana, L., Simon, C., Urassa, H., and Hampson, K.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Journal Abbr.:PLoS Negl. Trop. Dis.
Publisher:Public Library of Science
ISSN:1935-2727
ISSN (Online):1935-2735
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2014 2014 Sambo et al.
First Published:First published online in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 8(12):e3310
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
539491Understanding the role of contact networks in the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of zootonic diseaseSarah CleavelandWellcome Trust (WELLCOME)082715/B/07/ZRI BIODIVERSITY ANIMAL HEALTH & COMPMED
522631Epidemiological dynamics of rabies in rural Tanzania and impacts on local communitiesSarah CleavelandWellcome Trust (WELLCOME)087393/B/08/ZRI BIODIVERSITY ANIMAL HEALTH & COMPMED
539491Understanding the role of contact networks in the epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of zootonic diseaseSarah CleavelandWellcome Trust (WELLCOME)082715/B/07/ZRI BIODIVERSITY ANIMAL HEALTH & COMPMED